Archive for January, 2010

IBM this week reported fourth-quarter 2009 diluted earnings of $3.59 per share compared with diluted earnings of $3.37 per share in the same quarter one year ago. That represents a 10 percent jump, and the first time IBM has seen revenues increase in more than a year.

"We concluded a strong year with a solid performance in the fourth quarter in which we again delivered growth in margins, profit and earnings," said Samuel J. Palmisano, IBM chairman, president and chief executive officer. "IBM continued to benefit from our strategic transformation, offerings that our clients value in this economy, and our commitment to developing countries around the world."

Big blue also attributed its numbers to several investment opportunities, including cloud computing. Based on this, and other factors, IBM said it expects full-year 2010 diluted earnings per share to reach at least $11.00.

Image Credit: IBM

Governance, Risk, and Compliance (GRC) software vendor Lumigent on Tuesday announced it has closed a new round of funding worth $3 million courtesy of North Bridge Venture Partners. The company said it plans to use the new-found cash to accelerate its expansion.

"The audit and regulatory compliance burden on businesses contniues to grow, in an era of increased risk," said RedMon analyst James Governor. "Better business controls and governance processes are needed, but reactive, manual, and costly approaches dominate. AppGRC is designed for continuous audit, a more systematic approach to busienss systems compliance, with automated, policy-based reporting."

Lumigent kept busy in 2009 with the launch of its AppGRC for PeopleSoft Finance Management, which the company claims is the industry’s first automated GRC control app. Lumigent also added new partners to the fold, including Deltek and BTRG, and 15 new AppGRC customers.

"For us, 2009 was a year of proof," said John H. Capobianco, president and CEO of Lumigent.

Life is good in the international communications industry–if you’re Skype, that is. And everyone else? Not so much, according to data by research firm TeleGeography.

TeleGeography says that international telephone traffic has slowed way down, halting a trend that’s been in place for a quarter of a century. In the past 25 years, international call volume from telephones enjoyed a compounded annual growth rate of 15 percent. And while traffic is still on the rise, it’s slowed to just 8 percent, growing from 376 billion minutes in 2008 to about 406 billion minutes in 2009.

"Demand for international voice has been remarkably robust, but it’s clearly not recession-proof," said TeleGeography analyst Stephan Beckert.

Meanwhile, Skype’s international traffic is booming and remains ahead of the curve, having jumped 51 percent in 2008 and is projected to grow 63 percent in 2009, to 54 billion minutes, TeleGeography said.

"The volume of traffic routed via Skype is tremendous," Beckert added. "Skype is now the largest provider of cross-border communications in the world, by far."

Life is good in the international communications industry–if you’re Skype, that is. And everyone else? Not so much, according to data by research firm TeleGeography.

TeleGeography says that international telephone traffic has slowed way down, halting a trend that’s been in place for a quarter of a century. In the past 25 years, international call volume from telephones enjoyed a compounded annual growth rate of 15 percent. And while traffic is still on the rise, it’s slowed to just 8 percent, growing from 376 billion minutes in 2008 to about 406 billion minutes in 2009.

"Demand for international voice has been remarkably robust, but it’s clearly not recession-proof," said TeleGeography analyst Stephan Beckert.

Meanwhile, Skype’s international traffic is booming and remains ahead of the curve, having jumped 51 percent in 2008 and is projected to grow 63 percent in 2009, to 54 billion minutes, TeleGeography said.

"The volume of traffic routed via Skype is tremendous," Beckert added. "Skype is now the largest provider of cross-border communications in the world, by far."

Both AMD and Intel have fully embraced DDR3, and as a result, no one wants DDR2 anymore. Demand for DDR2 has fallen by the wayside, while DDR3 is selling through the roof. For Korea-based DRAM makers, the situation has left them with a surplus of DDR2 modules, and they don’t want them any more than consumers do.

The solution? Bundle DDR3 modules with DDR2 chips. Doing so will help clear out DDR2 inventories that have been piling up, and will also help keep the price gap between the two standards from widening. According to DigiTimes’ industry sources, the strategy is to minimize the impact that a DDR2 oversupply and DDR3 shortage would have on the market.

As it stands, sport market prices for 1.3GHz 1Gb DDR3 chips are averaging about $3.08, compared to $2.50 for 800MHz 1Gb DDR2 chips, according to the latest data from DRAMeXchange.

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